CamdenNewJournal

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Enrico Sidoli: £20k appeal goes on in search of 1976 heatwave killers

World In Action footage sought in cold case investigation into 15-year-old's death

27 July, 2018

Police have been unable to trace this man 

RELATIVES of a 15-year-old boy who died after being held under the water at Parliament Hill Lido during the heatwave summer of 1976 are still appealing for information which may lead to the men who attacked him.

New Journal coverage of the 40th anniversary of Enrico Sidoli’s death in 2016 sparked a national media appeal by cold-case detectives. An image of an unidentified man in the water on the day Enrico died was circulated but police are still waiting for a breakthrough.

The current heatwave and recent reports of bad behaviour at the Lido have served as an extra remind­er of the tragedy for the family as the anniversary passed on Thursday. A relative said the appeal was still in place. Enrico was attacked on July 8, 1976, and died from cardiac arrest on July 19.

Enrico (left) with his family

It is understood officers would like to see any extra footage taken by the World In Action team, who made a hard-hitting documentary about Enrico’s death. The film – The Very Public Death of Enrico Sidoli – helped spark a soul-searching debate about British society and how much people cared about others. It question­ed why a crowded pool with so many potential witnesses did not help prevent Enrico’s death or come forward later to identify his attackers. T

he teenager was reportedly assaulted, thrown into the pool and held under the water. A lifeguard helped resusc­itate him, but he died in hospital 11 days later.

A £20,000 reward, funded by the family, remains on the table for anybody who helps detectives crack the case. Half of this has been put up by the family. When the image of the unidentified man in the pool was released the Met said that “loyalties” may have changed and it was not too late for people with information to help. They are asked to call the Met’s specialist case investigation team on 020 7230 7963.

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