CamdenNewJournal

The independent London newspaper

8ft grizzly bear coming to Waterlow Park

Art students given space to show off their work

18 April, 2019 — By Dan Carrier

How the sculpture will look – with a screen of a huntsman in the distance

IF you go down to the woods, you’re in for a big surprise. Or Waterlow Park, at least.

Because art students from Central St Martins are about to take over the space for an outdoor sculpture exhibition, and one of the pieces is an 8ft-tall grizzly bear.

The show features work by students who are about to complete a foundation year that will lead to them becoming full-time art students at the prestigious university in King’s Cross.

Organised by the university in conjunction with art film charity Lux, Lauderdale House and Camden Council, 70 students have taken part.

The free event includes video installations by Lux and many of the pieces have been designed to fit in with a unique element of the Victorian pleasure gardens.

Friends of Waterlow Park chairwoman Fiona Murphy told the New Journal: “This is how an outdoor space should be used. It isn’t permanent and the pieces are designed to be in place for a short time. Waterlow Park is the perfect place for this – it is full of twists and turns. You turn around a corner and there is a piece of art. It is all fairly crazy, brilliantly imaginative and really dotty – what the students have come up with is just terrific.”

The sink artwork

Another piece of art will be a sink built into the ground.

Course tutor Adrian Scrivener said having an outdoor space allowed students to design site-specific pieces and consider how art sits in the landscapes.

He added: “The Waterlow Art Park is a snapshot of an educational experience and shows the inventiveness of these 18-year-olds rather than their technical expertise, as some are more advanced than others. Working with Waterlow Park is a great opportunity for our students to think about how their work changes when made for a public outdoor space, and to consider how it impacts on the environment.”

The exhibition runs from Friday, April 26 for three days and is free.

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